Maryland: Lord Baltimore’s Dream

“Lord Baltimore was anxious to see the vision for Maryland come to reality, and he realized that he needed to attract settlers in large numbers. To this end Lord Baltimore established extremely enticing and unprecedented offers to prospective settlers. All land grants were unique in that the grants made to Bill Hart 80 individuals were in perpetuity. Only if a landholder died without an heir would the land revert back to the Lord Proprietor. Those who could pay the expense for themselves and five servants would receive a grant for one thousand acres. Others with less than five servants were given one hundred acres plus another one hundred for each servant. Married settlers with less than five servants were given two hundred acres, and those with children were given an additional fifty acres for each child. Even widows with children, and single women received land grants.”—Chapter 3: Maryland

“It was a brutal sight, they clearly stood no chance, they couldn’t even get a defense perimeter organized, the Indians were on them and it was hand to hand fighting. The French were firing from behind trees and bushes. No one knew which way to turn. Fortunately for Coburn he and about twenty of the militia had been able to hide behind some rocks and form a firing line. They were at least holding their own. Again he thought the only way to describe this carnage was complete chaos. Was this what all battles were like?”—Chapter 5: Baltimore

“The firing began, first two cannon shot oil canisters and then the rest of the cannon fired shells. The ship was immediately in flames and you could hear the screaming of the pirates on board. Some were jumping overboard all inflamed. The first ship began to sink, and all on board were lost.”—Chapter 7: The New Republic

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MARYLAND:<br>The Story Continues

MARYLAND:
The Story Continues

In this book, the story of Maryland continues as the Kerr family lives through all of the trials and tribulations of a new but maturing country. Sectionalism, slavery, war, economic catastrophe, prejudice and hypocrisy would profoundly affect the Kerr family and nearly destroy the country. All of these events, along with a family legend dating back to the family’s patriarch, lead to a very exciting ending. For those who read my first book and were left with loose ends, will find them all tied together in the second book.