The Baltimore Bank Riot
The Baltimore Bank Riot
03/21/2017 Bill Hart

The Most Violent and Destructive Upheaval in American History   Union Bank of Maryland was the oldest bank in the state. It got its own charter in 1790. In 1831, the bank expanded greatly and attracted large amounts of deposits. However, due to money-making schemes allegedly committed by its bank directors, the bank could no
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Marylands Pride H. L. Mencken1
Maryland’s Pride: H. L. Mencken
03/14/2017 Bill Hart

A Brief History of Henry Louis Mencken   Henry Louis Mencken is one of the most famous sons of Maryland who became one of the most influential journalists during the first half of the twentieth century. As a celebrated writer, he was quite prolific with twenty-eight books, chapbooks, pamphlets, and essays. After his death at
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Tobacco Trade in the Chesapeake Bay State
Tobacco Trade in the Chesapeake Bay State
03/07/2017 Bill Hart

Maryland as a Pioneer American Colony and How Its Economy Relied on the Tobacco Trade Maryland, USA—a state bordering Virginia, West Virginia, Washington, DC, Pennsylvania, and Delaware—was one of the original thirteen colonies and is considered to be the birthplace of religious freedom in America. George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, formed this state in
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The Great Baltimore Fire
The Great Baltimore Fire
02/28/2017 Bill Hart

    In the past centuries, a great roaring fires have ravaged well-loved metropolises of America and the world—one of which, the most notoriously known, was the Great Baltimore Fire. On a frightful February 7 and 8 in 1904, a raging, nearly ceaseless blaze devoured a major portion of Baltimore, incinerating much of the central
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The United States Naval Academy The Early Years
The United States Naval Academy: The Early Years
02/21/2017 Bill Hart

Established in 1845 under Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft, the United States Naval Academy (USNA) was established on the grounds of the former US Army post Fort Severn in Annapolis, Maryland, at the confluence of the Severn River and the Chesapeake Bay. The USNA replaced Philadelphia Naval Asylum, in Philadelphia, that served as the
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maryland the divide
Maryland during the American Civil War: The Divide
01/31/2017 Bill Hart

When Union troops occupied the Maryland to prevent a vote in favor of Southern secession, many Marylanders who are sympathetic to the Southern cause decided to cross the Potomac River into Virginia in order to join and fight for the Confederacy. It has been estimated that (of the state’s 1860 population of 687,000) up to
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Maryland during the American Civil War
Maryland during the American Civil War
01/24/2017 Bill Hart

Aftermath of the Riot     After the April 19 riot, Mayor George William Brown and Maryland Governor Thomas Hicks implored President Abraham Lincoln to reroute troops around Baltimore city and through Annapolis to avoid further confrontations. Hearing no immediate reply from Washington, on the evening of April 19, Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown ordered
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Maryland during the American Civil War
Maryland during the American Civil War
01/17/2017 Bill Hart

Baltimore Riot of 1861 On April 12, 1861, the American Civil War began when Confederate batteries fired on the besieged Federal garrison at Fort Sumter. The next day, Fort Sumter fell without a single man lost. In response, President Abraham Lincoln issued a public proclamation on April 15 calling for seventy-five thousand volunteer soldiers to
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Maryland:<br>Lord Baltimore's Dream

Maryland:
Lord Baltimore's Dream

MARYLAND:<br>The Story Continues

MARYLAND:
The Story Continues